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This Saudi mega-corporation is fueling denial of climate change in the United States

Saudi Aramco's core area includes the headquarters and office buildings in Dhahran city. The buildings in this picture are the Al Mujamma Mosque (foreground), administration buildings (the two towers in the right background), the old admin building (right background shown between mosque and minaret) the engineering building (left background); the exploration and production building and exploration computing center are behind the engineering building and are not visible in this photo. Photo credit: Eagleamn/Wikimedia Commons
Saudi Aramco's core area includes the headquarters and office buildings in Dhahran city. The buildings in this picture are the Al Mujamma Mosque (foreground), administration buildings (the two towers in the right background), the old admin building (right background shown between mosque and minaret) the engineering building (left background); the exploration and production building and exploration computing center are behind the engineering building and are not visible in this photo. Photo credit: Eagleamn/Wikimedia Commons

Saudi Arabia has done everything in its power to deny the effects of climate change.

The kingdom has lobbied long and hard in the United States and around the world against climate science, activism, and legislation.

Economically, this makes perfect sense: Saudi Aramco, the most profitable corporation on the planet, with yearly earnings now topping US$110 billion dollars, is also responsible for more greenhouse gas emissions than any other corporation.

Aramco is the primary economic engine of the oil-rich nation, and even while it works on a more green and environmentally friendly public face, the government-owned corporation continues a multi-decades public-relations campaign in favor of fossil fuels and against alternative energy sources.

Aramco pushes its agenda, in particular, inside the United States, wielding its substantial influence through such key U.S. industry agencies such as American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers, and the American Petroleum Institute.

Ironically, the kingdom itself, situated in the desert terrain of the Arabian Peninsula, is already suffering the effects of climate change, such as increasingly severe heat waves, water scarcity, and unprecedented weather events, such as torrential rains.

Source: The Intercept

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